Make These 10 Medical Words A Part Of Your Vocabulary To Feel Smarter

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Visiting a doctor can be scary. It becomes even scarier when the good doctor starts using heavy and complicated words, which you have never heard before. You start panicking as soon as you hear words like tachyarrhythmia (fast heartbeat) or bradyarrhythmia (slow heartbeat). Before the doctor can explain the terminology and their consequences, you get worked up and induce hypertension (high blood pressure). Even though most of the words thrown by the doctors sound grave and ominous, some of them, are actually not so sinister. For instance, pyrosis (which refers to minor heartburn). Here are some words, which would make you panic a little less next time you visit the hospital for a checkup.

1) ACUPUNCTURE:

(Noun, Transitive Verb)

This is an ancient form of Chinese medication which restores the body’s energy. Very sharp and thin needles are used in a very strategic manner on specific points on the body to create a rush of energy.

This method is used as an alternative to surgery, to take care of pain and illness.

Derivation:

This word has been derived from the Latin word acus and the English word puncture. it had been used for the first time in the year 1684.

2) ANEMIA:

(Noun)

This is a medical condition, in which a person carries fewer red blood cells than the normal count. This makes the person weak and they tire easily.

Derivation:

This word has been derived from the Greek word, anaimia which means bloodlessness.

3) ACAMPSIA:

(Noun)

In this medical condition, the joints become rigid and stiff.  However this is different from paralysis. So, there is no need for panic.

Derivation:

This word had been derived from a Greek word which refers to inflexibility.

4) LACERATIONS:

(Noun)

In layman terminology, lacerations refer to the deep cuts and bruises. To be a little more scientific, it refers to the tearing of tissues. This condition involves the use of considerable amount of force, either internal or external.

Derivation:

This word had come into existence in the year 1597 from the Latin word lacero which means torn or ripped.

5) ACUTE:

(Adjective)

This medical condition is characterized by sudden severity and abrupt ending. Short duration and recent occurrence are the two key features of this condition. Sometimes, it could also refer to the severity of the illness.

Derivation:

This word originates from the Latin word acutas which means sharp.

6) BIOPSY:

(Noun, Transitive Verb)

The word Biopsy never fails to conjure the image of a huge syringe. Basically, this is a medical test, which involves the the removal of some  tissues/ fluids/ cells from the body. This test is generally (but, not always) prescribed by the doctors to diagnose cancer.

Derivation:  

This term had been coined by a French dermatologist Ernest Besnier in the year 1895 from the French word biopsie. It was a combination word derived from the Greek word bi, which was equivalent to bios (meaning life) and opsis which referred to sight.

7) BENIGN:

(Adjective)

Benign is the opposite of malignant (serious and dangerous).  It refers to the absence of cancer or basically it is used to refer to those tumors which are not so harmful and are not life threatening.

Derivation:

This word has been derived from the Latin word benignus.

8) PARALYSIS:

(Noun)

This refers to a medical condition, where the patient is unable to move or feel any kind of sensation in a particular region of the body. It is usually an effect of some grave external accident or some surgical complication. It results in loss of movement.

Derivation:

The origin of this word is from the Greek word paralyein, which means to loosen or disable.

9) REMISSION:

(Noun)

Remission is the period of time when the patient recovers from a particularly grave life-threatening illness. The intensity of the disease decreases and the patient begins to regain his/her health.

Derivation:

This term has been a part of medical jargon since the 15th century. it has the influence of Old French ‘remission’ and Latin, ‘remissionem’.

10) SYNDROME:

(Noun)

This is a term used to refer to some clinical conditions with similar symptoms. These common symptoms correlate with each other and are collectively referred to as syndromes.

Derivation:

This word has been derived from the Greek term, syndrome.

The next time you visit your doctor, flaunt your newly acquired medical vocabulary! 

 

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